NIH revamps their Rigor and Reproducibility webpage

NIH has added new resources to their Rigor and Reproducibility webpage. According to NIH Deputy Director for Extramural Research Mike Lauer, “the webpage now reflects policy updates and explores new resources, all in a simple and easy to read manner. And, better yet, these changes do not reflect any additional requirements or forms!”

Lauer shared news of the redesign in a December 13 Open Mike blog post. The main focus of the redesigned page is clarifying what is meant by “scientific premise” of grant applications. Lauer points out that the original NIH definition of the term referred to the rigor of the prior research used to support the proposal, rather than just referring to the hypothesis or rationale for the proposed study.

The Rigor and Reproducibility page links to four subpages, including relevant guidance, application preparation resources, training materials, and links to notices, blogs, and other resources. The application preparation resources may be of most interest to Miami faculty, as they include examples of the rigor of some funded proposals, tools for enhancing or clarifying the rigor of your application, and examples of plans for authenticating chemicals, plasmid DNA, antibodies, and cell lines.


Written by Amy Hurley Cooper, Assistant Director of Proposal Development, Office for the Advancement of Research and Scholarship, Miami University.

Photos by Miami University Photo Services.