What is a grant forecast?

Icons depicting various sorts of weather: sunny, partly cloudy, partly sunny, cloudy, some rain, more rain, thunderstorm, severe thunderstorm, snow-rain mix, snow, hail, chance of showers, fog.

We are pleased to reblog this post from the Grants.gov Community Blog.


Sunny with a slight chance of competition? Cold and gloomy thanks to freezing funds?

While federal grant applicants may at times face such varying climates, the grant forecasts we refer to here are previews of potential funding opportunities that a grant-making agency plans to announce in the future.

Applicants can search for grant forecasts just as they would for funding opportunities – by using Grants.gov Search.

Screenshot of Grants.gov search. Arrows point out the "Opportunity Status" filter, where "Forecasted" is selected and the "Opportunity Status" column in the results table.

By checking Forecasted under “Opportunity Status,” searches can be tailored to turn up forecasted opportunities.

Opportunities are “forecasted” when funds are not yet formally available and are pending budgetary and discretionary spending approvals and federal agency program decisions.

Grants.gov encourages agencies to publish their forecasts in Search; however, applicants may also find forecasted opportunities listed on the grant-making agency’s website.

For example, the Department of Education has posted its Fiscal Year 2017 forecasts here.

The Department of Education explains that the listing is “advisory only and is not an official application notice of the Department of Education. …Please keep in mind that the dates recorded in this document are SUBJECT TO CHANGE and that the average size/number of awards are ESTIMATES.”

To learn more about accessing forecasts published on Grants.gov, watch the “How to Locate Federal Grant Forecasts” video.


Source: What Is a Grant Forecast?

Tropical Cyclone Carlos photo by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center via Flickr. Forecast icons image by By Clker-Free-Vector-Images / 29611 images via Pixabay. Both used under Creative Commons license.

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