This week’s funding opportunity notices (weekly)

  • The Combinatorics program supports research on discrete structures and includes algebraic, enumerative, existential, extremal, geometric, and probabilistic combinatorics, including graph theory.ConferencesPrincipal Investigators should carefully read the program solicitation "Conferences and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences" (link below) to obtain important information regarding the substance of proposals for conferences, workshops, summer/winter schools, and similar activities. Conference proposals must be submitted at least six months in advance of the conference, and in the same fiscal year (which begins October 1) if possible.

    tags: grants math

  • The Physical Anthropology Program supports basic research in areas related to human evolution and contemporary human biological variation. Research areas supported by the program include, but are not limited to, human genetic variation, human adaptation, human osteology and bone biology, human and nonhuman primate paleontology, functional anatomy, and primate socioecology. Grants supported in these areas are united by an underlying evolutionary framework, and often a consideration of adaptation as a central theoretical theme. Many proposals also have a biocultural orientation. The program frequently serves as a bridge within NSF between the social and behavioral sciences and the natural and physical sciences, and proposals are commonly jointly reviewed and funded with other programs.For more information about the Crosscutting Research and Training Opportunities, please visit the Cross-Directorate Activities webpage. Here, you will find a brief synopsis about each program, as well as links guiding you to the appropriate Program Solicitations.Also, for more information on the Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grants please visit the Physical Anthropology specific page.Under NSF’s data sharing policy, the Foundation expects investigators to share with other researchers, at no more than incremental cost and within a reasonable time, the data, samples, physical collections, and other supporting materials created or gathered in the course of the work. To implement that policy in ways appropriate to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology, beginning July 1, 2005 these Programs will require that all proposals include a one-page detailed description of the applicant’s data access plan in the “Supplementary Documents” section. This page will be in addition to the standard 15-page project description. Applications lacking this statement will not be reviewed. The Programs realize that individual cases may differ widely and recognize that any absolute timeline or rigid set of rules is not possible. They also recognize that revision and adjustment may often be required as the work proceeds. The data access plan, however, will be considered an integral part of the project and therefore subject to reviewer and panel evaluation. Major departure from it will constitute a significant project change and require NSF approval. Successful applicants will be required to address this issue in every progress and final report. PIs on all awards made under these guidelines will be expected to discuss implementation of their plans in the “Results of Prior Research” section when they submit subsequent applications.

    tags: grants anthropology

  • The Archaeology Program provides support for anthropologically relevant archaeological research at both a "senior" and doctoral dissertation level. It also funds anthropologically significant archaeometric research and high risk exploratory research proposals. For more information about multi-disciplinary research and training opportunities, please visit the SBE Office of Multidisciplinary Activities (SMA) web site. Also, for more information on the Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grants, please visit the Archaeology specific page.

    tags: grants anthropology

  • The Algebra and Number Theory program supports research in algebra, algebraic and arithmetic geometry, number theory, and representation theory. Conferences Principal Investigators should carefully read the program solicitation "Conferences and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences" (link below) to obtain important information regarding the substance of proposals for conferences, workshops, summer/winter schools, and similar activities. For conference proposals with budgets not exceeding $50,000, which in accordance with NSF policy can be reviewed internally at NSF, the following target dates are in effect: For an event that will take place at some time prior to October 1 during a given year, the proposal should be submitted in October of the previous year. For an event that will occur in the period October 1 through December 31 of a given year, the proposal should be submitted in May of that year. A conference proposal with a budget request exceeding $50,000 should be submitted roughly seven months before the event is scheduled to take place, in order to allow time for external review.

    tags: grants math

  • The Probability Program supports research on the theory and applications of probability. Subfields include discrete probability, stochastic processes, limit theory, interacting particle systems, stochastic differential and partial differential equations, and Markov processes. Research in probability which involves applications to other areas of science and engineering is especially encouraged. Conferences Principal Investigators should carefully read the program solicitation "Conferences and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences" (link below) to obtain important information regarding the substance of proposals for conferences, workshops, summer/winter schools, and similar activities. Conference and workshop proposals should be submitted eight months before the requested start date.

    tags: grants math

  • The Applied Mathematics program supports mathematics research motivated by or having an effect on problems arising in science and engineering. Mathematical merit and novelty, as well as breadth and quality of impact on applications, are important factors. Proposals to develop critical mathematical techniques from individual investigators as well as interdisciplinary teams are encouraged. ConferencesPrincipal Investigators should carefully read the program solicitation "Conferences and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences" (link below) to obtain important information regarding the substance of proposals for conferences, workshops, summer/winter schools, and similar activities. To facilitate timely notification of the availability of support:proposals for conferences, workshops, etc., to be held in the US must be submitted 8 months in advance of the conference date; proposals to support group travel to meetings outside the US must be submitted 12 months in advance of the meeting date;proposals for conferences, workshops, etc., whose budget request exceeds $50,000 must be submitted during the annual November 1-15 submission window.

    tags: grants math

  • The Analysis Program supports basic research in that area of mathematics whose roots can be traced to the calculus of Newton and Leibniz. Given its centuries-old ties to physics, analysis has influenced developments from Newton’s mechanics to quantum mechanics and from Fourier’s study of heat conduction to Maxwell’s equations of electromagnetism to Witten’s theory of supersymmetry. More generally, research supported by Analysis provides the theoretical underpinning for the majority of applications of the mathematical sciences to other scientific disciplines. Current areas of significant activity include: nonlinear partial differential equations; dynamical systems and ergodic theory; real, complex and harmonic analysis; operator theory and algebras of operators on Hilbert space; mathematical physics; and representation theory of Lie groups/algebras. Emerging areas include random matrix theory and its ties to classical analysis, number theory, quantum mechanics, and coding theory; and development of noncommutative geometry with its applications to modeling physical phenomena. It should be stressed, however, that the underlying role of the Analysis Program is to provide support for research in mathematics at the most fundamental level. Although this is often done with the expectation that the research will generate a payoff in applications at some point down the road, the principal mission of the Program is to tend and replenish an important reservoir of mathematical knowledge, maintaining it as a dependable resource to be drawn upon by engineers, life and physical scientists, and other mathematical scientists, as need arises.ConferencesPrincipal Investigators should carefully read the program solicitation “Conferences and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences” (link below) to obtain important information regarding the substance of “conference proposals” (i.e., proposals for conferences, workshops, summer/winter schools, and similar activities). For Analysis conference proposals with budgets not exceeding $50,000, which in accordance with NSF policy can be reviewed internally at NSF, the following target dates are in effect: for an event that will take place at some time prior to October 1 during a given year, the proposal should be submitted at the Analysis Program’s normal target date in the previous year; for an event that will occur in the period October 1 through December 31 of a given year, the proposal should be submitted between May 1 and June 1 of that year. An Analysis conference proposal with a budget request exceeding $50,000 should be submitted roughly seven months before the event is scheduled to take place, in order to allow time for external review.

    tags: grants math

  • The program in Foundations supports research in mathematical logic and the foundations of mathematics, including proof theory, recursion theory, model theory, set theory, and infinitary combinatorics. ConferencesPrincipal Investigators should carefully read the program solicitation "Conferences and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences" (link below) to obtain important information regarding the substance of proposals for conferences, workshops, summer/winter schools, and similar activities. Conference and workshop proposals should be submitted eight months before the requested start date.

    tags: grants math

  • Supports research on algebraic topology, including homotopy theory, ordinary and extraordinary homology and cohomology, cobordism theory, and K-theory; topological manifolds and cell complexes, fiberings, knots, and links; differential topology and actions of groups of transformations; geometric group theory; and general topology and continua theory. ConferencesPrincipal Investigators should carefully read the program solicitation "Conferences and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences" (link below) to obtain important information regarding the substance of proposals for conferences, workshops, summer/winter schools, and similar activities. Conference and workshop proposals should be submitted eight months before the requested start date.

    tags: grants math

  • The program in Geometric Analysis supports research on differential geometry and its relation to partial differential equations and variational principles; aspects of global analysis, including the differential geometry of complex manifolds and geometric Lie group theory; geometric methods in modern mathematical physics; and geometry of convex sets, integral geometry, and related geometric topics. Conferences Principal Investigators should carefully read the program solicitation "Conferences and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences" (link below) to obtain important information regarding the substance of proposals for conferences, workshops, summer/winter schools, and similar activities. Conference and workshop proposals should be submitted eight months before the requested start date.

    tags: grants math

  • Supports mathematical research in areas of science where computation plays a central and essential role, emphasizing design, analysis, and implementation of numerical methods and algorithms, and symbolic methods. The prominence of computation with analysis of the computational approach in the research is a hallmark of the program. Proposals ranging from single-investigator projects that develop and analyze innovative computational methods to interdisciplinary team projects that not only create and analyze new mathematical and computational techniques but also use/implement them to model, study, and solve important application problems are encouraged.

    tags: grants math

  • The Statistics Program supports research in statistical theory and methods, including research in statistical methods for applications to any domain of science and engineering. The theory forms the base for statistical science. The methods are used for stochastic modeling, and the collection, analysis and interpretation of data. The methods characterize uncertainty in the data and facilitate advancement in science and engineering. The Program encourages proposals ranging from single-investigator projects to interdisciplinary team projects.

    tags: grants math

  • The Chemical Measurement and Imaging Program supports research focusing on chemically-relevant measurement science and imaging, targeting both improved understanding of new and existing methods and development of innovative approaches and instruments. Research areas include but are not limited to sampling and separation science; electrochemistry; spectrometry; frequency- and time-domain spectroscopy; sensors and bioassays; and microscopy. Chemical (as opposed to morphological) imaging and measurement tools probing chemical properties and processes across a wide range of spatial scales – from macroscopic structures down to single molecules – are supported, as are innovations enabling the monitoring and imaging of rapid chemical and electronic processes and new approaches to data analysis and interpretation, including chemometrics. Proposals addressing established techniques must seek improved understanding and/or innovative approaches to substantially broaden applicability. Sensor-related proposals should address new science and/or entirely new approaches with prospects for broad utility and significant enhancement of current capabilities. Assembly of array-type devices using known sensing mechanisms is better suited to programs elsewhere, as is tailoring of known sensing mechanisms to specific new applications. Similarly, engineering aspects of microfluidics and "lab-on-a-chip" device design, technology, and application, are better directed elsewhere. Development of imaging contrast agents is not supported, although proposals addressing entirely new mechanisms of chemical imaging can be.Included among proposals considered by the Program are those (formerly submitted to the CRIF:ID program) for which the primary focus is on development of new instrumentation enabling chemical measurements likely to be of wide interest and utility to the chemistry research community. Such proposals should include the words "Instrument Development" at the beginning of the title, and include in the Project Description consideration of a development timeline, potential utility, and prospects for promulgation of the idea, should it prove viable; these tend to be of interest to reviewers of instrument development proposals. Proposals with large equipment requests (over $150,000) may be better suited to the Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Program; investigators are urged to discuss such proposals with a program officer before submission. Proposals with anticipated utility primarily in other communities (e.g., biology) should be directed to programs in other Directorates or to MRI. Industrial partnerships (e.g., via "GOALI" – Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry) are encouraged as means of enhancing promulgation, but concepts nearing commercialization are better fits to SBIR or STTR Programs.Proposals for optimizing and/or utilizing established methods for specific applications should be directed to programs focused on the application. There are closely-related programs in other Divisions; where to submit depends on the primary focus of the proposed research.

    tags: grants chemistry

  • The Macromolecular, Supramolecular and Nanochemistry (MSN) Program focuses on basic research in chemistry that addresses the creation or study of macromolecular, supramolecular and nanoscopic species and other organized structures that show unique chemical and physical properties and reactivities. Research of interest to this program includes the following: (1) Novel synthesis relevant to the program topics, innovative surface functionalization methodologies, surface monolayer chemistry, template-directed synthesis, and the formation of clusters, aggregates, nanoparticles, polymers and large (macro)molecular architectures. (2) The study of molecular scale interactions that give rise to molecular, macromolecular or nanoparticulate self-assembly into discrete structures; understanding unique chemical and physicochemical properties and reactivities that result from the organized or nanoscopic structures; the study of forces and dynamics that are responsible for spatial organization in discrete organic, inorganic or hybrid systems (excluding extended solids); and chemically dynamic systems like molecular machines. (3) Investigations that utilize advanced experimental or computational methods to understand or to predict the chemical structure, properties and reactivities of unique macromolecular, supramolecular and nanostructures. Studies involving extended solids and bulk materials are not appropriate for this program, and proposals for which the primary focus is on (bio)materials or device properties / engineering are also not appropriate for this program.

    tags: grants chemistry

  • The Environmental Chemical Sciences (ECS) Program supports basic research in chemistry that promotes the understanding of natural and anthropogenic chemical processes in our environment. Projects supported by this program enable fundamentally new avenues of basic research and transformative technologies. The program is particularly interested in studying molecular phenomena on surfaces and interfaces in order to understand the inherently complex and heterogeneous environment. Projects utilize advanced experimental, modeling and computational approaches, as well as developing new approaches. Topics include studies of environmental surfaces and interfaces under laboratory conditions, the fundamental properties of water and water solutions important in environmental processes, dissolution, composition, origin and behavior of molecular scale systems under a variety of naturally occurring environmental conditions, chemical reactivity of synthetic nanoparticles and their molecular level interactions with the environment, and application of theoretical models and computational approaches to discover and predict environmental phenomena at the molecular scale.The ECS program supports research in basic chemical aspects of our environment. Programs in the Biological Sciences, Engineering and Geosciences Directorates as well as other federal agencies address other aspects such as field studies.

    tags: grants chemistry

  • The Chemistry of Life Processes (CLP) program supports the investigation of problems at the Chemistry-Biology interface in which the primary approach or tools employed are those of chemistry. The fundamental examination of mechanisms, dynamics, recognition and structure/function relationships at the molecular level is at the core of the CLP program. Projects that integrate experimental and theoretical chemical approaches into studies of biomolecules or biomolecular processes in the domain of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids will be considered. The use of small molecules such as ligands, inhibitors, signal transducers or molecular beacons to interrogate biological systems is a characteristic mode of inquiry for CLP investigators. The program also welcomes the application of computational and spectroscopic methods to examine Nature’s macromolecular machinery and processes. Appropriate areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to, peptide design, protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, post-translational modification alternative base pairs, epigenetics, signal and energy transduction pathways, and molecular definition of emerging "codes" such as those associated with glycomics and histones. Mechanisms of enzyme and metalloenzyme activity, ribozyme and/or riboswitch function and of DNA damage and covalent modification are also central themes in the program. Proposals that predominantly utilize biological tools or techniques may be more appropriate for the Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences (MCB). Proposals that address biomedical problems may be more appropriate for the National Institutes of Health or other health-directed funding agencies.

    tags: grants chemistry

  • The Chemical Catalysis Program supports experimental and theoretical research directed towards the fundamental understanding of the chemistry of catalytic processes at the molecular level. The Program accepts proposals on catalytic approaches which facilitate, direct, and accelerate efficient chemical transformations. This includes the design and synthesis of catalytic and pre-catalytic species on the molecular, supramolecular, and nanometer scales; and studies of the dynamics of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic processes. Processes of interest include (but are not limited to) polymerization catalysis, single site catalysis, asymmetric catalysis, and biologically-inspired catalysis. Applications of modeling, theory, and simulation to catalytic processes are also relevant. Submissions that advance chemical catalysis and address national needs for sustainability are of particular interest. These include fundamental studies of energy-related catalytic processes, CO2 conversion, electrocatalysis (such as in water splitting and fuel cells), photocatalysis (such as in solar energy conversion), catalytic conversions of fossil fuels and biomass, and environmentally-friendly chemical processes.The Program does not support applied catalysis research that focuses on scale-up, processing, transport dynamics, long-term stability and other engineering aspects of catalysis. The Program also does not support biocatalysis research with purely biological enzymes and cellular systems.

    tags: grants chemistry

  • The Chemical Theory, Models and Computational Methods program supports the discovery and development of theoretical and computational methods or models to address a range of chemical challenges, with emphasis on emerging areas of chemical research. Proposals that focus on established theoretical or computational approaches should involve innovative additions or modifications that substantially broaden their applicability. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to, electronic structure, quantum reaction dynamics, statistical mechanics, molecular dynamics, and simulation and modeling techniques for molecular systems and systems in condensed phases. Areas of application span the full range of chemical systems from small molecules to mesoscopic aggregates, including single molecules, biological systems and materials in condensed phases. Despite the diverse application areas, the goal of the program is to support the development of new theoretical and computational methodologies that have the potential of being broadly applicable to a range of challenging chemical problems. We are particularly interested in fundamental areas of chemical research that are difficult or impossible to address using current synthetic, experimental, and/or computational methodologies. We encourage the integration of innovative software development with methodological and algorithmic development, especially computational approaches that allow efficient utilization of the high end computers of the future.Proposals that utilize established theoretical and modeling approaches to solve problems in chemistry, biology or materials discovery and design may be more appropriate for other programs in either the Chemistry division or in other Divisions or Directorates.

    tags: grants chemistry

  • The Chemical Synthesis program focuses on the development of new, efficient synthetic methodologies and on the synthesis of complex molecules and molecular ensembles. Typical synthetic targets involve novel structures, structures displaying unique properties, or structures providing pathways to discover and elucidate new phenomena. Examples of supported research areas include the development of innovative reagents, catalysts for synthetic transformations, discovery of new synthetic methods, target-oriented synthesis, green synthesis, and synthesis of novel organic, organometallic, and inorganic structures. Research in this program will generate fundamental knowledge of chemical synthesis that enables the development of new avenues of basic chemical research and transformative technologies. The Chemical Synthesis program does not support projects whose main objective is on the property of the systems even though it may involve a large synthetic component.

    tags: grants chemistry

  • CISE’s Division of Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS) supports research and education projects that develop new knowledge in three core programs:

    • The Cyber-Human Systems(CHS) program;
    • The Information Integration and Informatics (III)program; and
    • The Robust Intelligence (RI) program.

    Proposals in the area of computer graphics and visualization may be submitted to anyof the three core programs described above. Proposers are invited to submit proposals in three project classes, which are defined as follows:

    • Small Projects – up to $500,000 total budget with durations up to three years;
    • Medium Projects – $500,001 to $1,200,000 total budget with durations up to four years; and
    • Large Projects – $1,200,001 to $3,000,000 total budget with durations up to five years.

    A more complete description of the three project classes can be found in section II. Program Description of this document.

    tags: grants math

  • The Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE) offers Postdoctoral Research Fellowships in two tracks: (i) Broadening Participation (SPRF-BP), and (ii) Interdisciplinary Research in Behavioral and Social Sciences (SPRF-IBSS). See the full text of the solicitation for detailed description of these tracks.

    tags: grants behavior economics

  • This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) seeks to stimulate research on mid-life adults (those 50 to 64 years of age) that can inform efforts to optimize health and wellness as individuals age, and prevent illness and disability in later years.

    tags: grant aging

  • The John Merck Fund has had a longstanding interest in people with intellectual and developmental disorders since its inception in 1970.  In 2012, JMF launched the Developmental Disabilities Translational Research Program, which supports researchers in developing treatments and improving outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities, particularly Down syndrome and Fragile X syndrome (and FX associated disorders).  The awards are made to the most highly innovative translational research projects that have the greatest potential of investigating rational and effective treatments and interventions for the particular condition being addressed.  The program emphasizes interdisciplinary collaborative grant applications focused primarily on FXS and DS, but the program supports studies focused on other developmental disabilities under special circumstances.  The Fund is particularly interested in translational research that is designed to improve the lives of people with developmental disabilities and their families.  Investigators from a range of disciplines are encouraged to apply.

    tags: grant biomed

  • Funds up to $150,000 are available for support of research directly related to blepharospasm or Meige’s Syndrome, both forms of cranial dystonia
    M.D. or Ph.D. required for principal investigator
    Non-U.S. citizens, working at institutions abroad are also eligible to apply for a research grant
    Research proposals must relate specifically to benign essential blepharospasm and Meige to include new treatments, pathophysiology and genetics, photophobia and dry eye.
    If a grant is awarded, we expect a semiannual progress report
    Deadline to apply is August 31 each year.
    Grant guidelines and a listing of previous grants may be downloaded below or obtained from:

    tags: grant biomed

  • The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) requests applications for the NIAMS Resource-based Centers Program (P30) for rheumatic diseases research areas within its mission. The Resource-based Centers will provide critical research infrastructure, shared facilities, services, and/or resources to groups of investigators conducting research on rheumatic diseases, enabling them to conduct their independently-funded individual and/or collaborative research projects more efficiently and/or more effectively, with the broad overall goal of accelerating, enriching, and enhancing the effectiveness of ongoing basic, translational, and clinical research and promoting new research within the NIAMS mission.

    tags: grant biomed

  • This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages grant applications from investigators interested in conducting basic research studies into the biological/genetic causes and mechanisms of cancer health disparities. These awards will support pilot and feasibility studies designed to investigate biological/genetic bases of cancer disparities, such as (1) mechanistic studies of biological factors associated with cancer disparities, (2) the development and testing of new methodologies and models, and (3) secondary data analyses. This FOA is also designed to aid and facilitate the growth of a nationwide cohort of scientists with a high level of basic research expertise in cancer health disparities research who can expand available resources and tools, such as biospecimens, cell lines and methods that are necessary to conduct basic research in cancer health disparities. In addition, the FOA will further the development of scientific areas, providing support for early-stage exploratory projects that lead to future in-depth mechanistic studies (such as R01 projects) of the biology of cancer health disparities.  

    tags: grants cancer

  • The CCWH will award $20,000 to a scholar, with a Ph.D. or has advanced to candidacy, who has not followed a traditional academic path of uninterrupted and completed secondary, undergraduate, and graduate degrees leading to a tenure-track faculty position. Although the recipient’s degrees do not have to be in history, the recipient’s work should clearly be historical in nature. In accordance with the general goals of CCWH, the award is intended to recognize or to enhance the ability of the recipient to contribute significantly to women in history, whether in the profession in the present or in the study of women in the past. It is not intended that there be any significant restrictions placed on how a given recipient shall spend the award as long as it advances the recipient’s scholarship goals and purposes.

    tags: award history

  • To support the study of southern history and promote the use of the collections housed at the University of Alabama, the Frances S. Summersell Center for the Study of the South and the University of Alabama Libraries will offer a total of eight fellowships in the amount of $500 each for researchers whose projects entail work to be conducted in southern history or southern studies at the W.S. Hoole Special Collections Library (http://www.lib.ua.edu/libraries/hoole/), the A.S. Williams III Americana Collection (http://www.lib.ua.edu/williamscollection), or in other University of Alabama collections.

    tags: fellowships history

  • o honor a long-time member and past president of the Society for Reformation Research, the society offers the Miriam Usher Chrisman Travel Fellowship of $2000 every other year in odd-numbered years to doctoral students who need to travel abroad to do research for their dissertations. The award competition is open to all students of European studies, ca. 1450-1650, whose dissertations deal with religion or the Reformation in some significant way. All geographic and confessional concentrations are eligible, and students just beginning their archival research as well as those finishing are encouraged to apply. The purpose of the award is to help defray the expenses of working abroad.
    Applicants should provide a 3-5 pp. description of their research projects, which must include when and where they plan to use the fellowship. (This description should be double-spaced with 1″ margins and 12-point type.) Applicants should keep in mind that just sending in a dissertation prospectus is insufficient, as the selection committee wants to know more specifically how the fellowship will be used and how the funds will help the applicants complete their dissertations. Applicants should also provide a curriculum vitae and ask their dissertation advisers to submit a letter of recommendation. All materials should be sent directly via email as attachments (in MS Word or as a pdf) to Beth Plummer beth.plummer@wku.edu, the Recording Officer of the society. She will then forward all materials to the Chrisman selection committee appointed by the current President of the society.  The Recording Officer must receive all materials by Monday, March 2, 2015.

    tags: fellowship student

  • The Medici Archive Project (MAP), based at the Archivio di Stato in Florence, Italy, is delighted to be able to offer two fellowships, generously supported by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, for graduate students in the field of art history in 2015.

     Since its foundation in 1993, the Medici Archive Project has grown from a digital humanities foundation into a research institution, all the while remaining a strong advocate of giving scholars direct access to original documents. Through the BIA platform (bia.medici.org), MAP has brought the contents of one of Europe’s most important early modern archival collections, the epistolary archive of the Grand Ducal Medici, to a global audience of students and scholars. Composed of some three million letters, the collection provides an unparalleled insight into the entire early modern world, from the early sixteenth to the mid eighteenth century. Based upon this wealth of material, much of it unexplored, MAP has developed both an international fellowship of scholars and several research programs. (More details can be found at our website: http://www.medici.org)

    tags: fellowships history students

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